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MATHEMATICS LESSON PLAN 1

Aim: What do I want students to achieve?
Why am I teaching this lesson?
What approach will I use?
Have I taken into account students’ prior knowledge?

Learning Outcomes
PROCESS: (1-3 WM outcomes with content descriptors)

CONTENT: (2 outcomes with at least 2 content descriptors for each outcome – you need to include Whole Number and one other strand to integrate)

Resources:
List the resources you will need for the entire lesson.
Students and teacher are not included!

Assessment Strategies:
You need to note actual assessment strategies (eg observation, work samples, annotations, photographs, discussion….) and reflective questions that will help you assess children’s understanding.
How will I know students are achieving the learning outcomes?
What kind of evidence will I collect?
How will I collect the evidence?
How will I annotate the evidence?
What will I do with the evidence?

Teaching & Learning Activities
Introduction:  (time)
What teaching strategies will I use to introduce this lesson using a constructivist approach? Will I do a brief activity to introduce the concept?
How will I engage the students?
How will I connect prior learning to this lesson?
Teaching Notes:
How will the students be organised?
n.b. Information in this section would enable other teachers to pick up your lesson plan and teach this lesson.

Body:  (time)
Provide details of the major steps which will be taken in the body of the lesson.

What activities will the students engage in?
Will you employ specific questioning strategies?

This is a step-by-step account. Dot points are recommended.

What will the teacher be doing while the students are engaged in the activity?

Is there specific grouping you need to mention here?

Conclusion:  (time)
How will the students consolidate their learning? Will you do another brief activity to sum up the learning?
What form of reflection will take place?

Potential for differentiation and integration

How can you differentiate the learning for emergent and more advanced learners?
How are you able to integrate this lesson with other KLAs?

Lesson Evaluation: You need to make your questions specific to your lesson!

What worked/what didn’t? (Eg consider teaching strategies, timing, resources, classroom management and organisation….)
Did the lesson go as planned?
To what extent were the outcomes achieved?
Were there any unexpected outcomes?
How would I change this lesson for future use?
Did the lesson cater for all students?
Where do I take the students now?

MATHEMATICS LESSON PLAN 2

Aim: What do I want students to achieve?
Why am I teaching this lesson?
What approach will I use?
Have I taken into account students’ prior knowledge?

Learning Outcomes
PROCESS: (1-3 WM outcomes with content descriptors)

CONTENT: (2 outcomes with at least 2 content descriptors for each outcome – you need to include Whole Number and one other strand to integrate)

Resources:
List the resources you will need for the entire lesson.
Students and teacher are not included!

Assessment Strategies:
You need to note actual assessment strategies and reflective questions that will help you assess children’s understanding.
How will I know students are achieving the learning outcomes?
What kind of evidence will I collect?
How will I collect the evidence?
How will I annotate the evidence?
What will I do with the evidence?

Teaching & Learning Activities
Introduction:  (time)
What teaching strategies will I use to introduce this lesson using a constructivist approach? Will I do a brief activity to introduce the concept?
How will I engage the students?
How will I connect prior learning to this lesson?
Teaching Notes:
How will the students be organised?
n.b. Information in this section would enable other teachers to pick up your lesson plan and teach this lesson.

Body:  (time)
Provide details of the major steps which will be taken in the body of the lesson.

What activities will the students engage in?
Will you employ specific questioning strategies?

This is a step-by-step account. Dot points are recommended.

What will the teacher be doing while the students are engaged in the activity?

Is there specific grouping you need to mention here?

Conclusion:  (time)
How will the students consolidate their learning? Will you do another brief activity to sum up the learning?
What form of reflection will take place?

Potential for differentiation and integration

How can you differentiate the learning for emergent and more advanced learners?
How are you able to integrate this lesson with other KLAs?

Lesson Evaluation: You need to make your questions specific to your lesson!

What worked/what didn’t? (Eg consider teaching strategies, timing, resources, classroom management and organisation….)
Did the lesson go as planned?
To what extent were the outcomes achieved?
Were there any unexpected outcomes?
How would I change this lesson for future use?
Did the lesson cater for all students?
Where do I take the students now?

MATHEMATICS LESSON PLAN 3

Aim: What do I want students to achieve?
Why am I teaching this lesson?
What approach will I use?
Have I taken into account students’ prior knowledge?

Learning Outcomes
PROCESS: (1-3 WM outcomes with content descriptors)

CONTENT: (2 outcomes with at least 2 content descriptors for each outcome – you need to include Whole Number and one other strand to integrate)

Resources:
List the resources you will need for the entire lesson.
Students and teacher are not included!

Assessment Strategies:
You need to note actual assessment strategies and reflective questions that will help you assess children’s understanding.
How will I know students are achieving the learning outcomes?
What kind of evidence will I collect?
How will I collect the evidence?
How will I annotate the evidence?
What will I do with the evidence?

Teaching & Learning Activities
Introduction:  (time)
What teaching strategies will I use to introduce this lesson using a constructivist approach? Will I do a brief activity to introduce the concept?
How will I engage the students?
How will I connect prior learning to this lesson?
Teaching Notes:
How will the students be organised?
n.b. Information in this section would enable other teachers to pick up your lesson plan and teach this lesson.

Body:  (time)
Provide details of the major steps which will be taken in the body of the lesson.

What activities will the students engage in?
Will you employ specific questioning strategies?

This is a step-by-step account. Dot points are recommended.

What will the teacher be doing while the students are engaged in the activity?

Is there specific grouping you need to mention here?

Conclusion:  (time)
How will the students consolidate their learning? Will you do another brief activity to sum up the learning?
What form of reflection will take place?

Potential for differentiation and integration

How can you differentiate the learning for emergent and more advanced learners?
How are you able to integrate this lesson with other KLAs?

Lesson Evaluation: You need to make your questions specific to your lesson!

What worked/what didn’t? (Eg consider teaching strategies, timing, resources, classroom management and organisation….)
Did the lesson go as planned?
To what extent were the outcomes achieved?
Were there any unexpected outcomes?
How would I change this lesson for future use?
Did the lesson cater for all students?
Where do I take the students now?

Justification

How do the planned teaching and learning activities promote students’ knowledge, skills and understanding of the specified mathematical concepts?

MATHEMATICS LESSON PLAN # 1
Early Stage 1, Kindergarten
Aim: Individually and as groups, students will practice reading and ordering of whole numbers from one to ten. Students will use skills such as questioning, reasoning and reflection to justify their assumptions and consolidate their learning.
Learning Outcomes
Process:
Communicating MAe-1WM
Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings
•    Describes the number before as ‘one less than’ and the number after as ‘one more than’ a given number
•    Asks questions involving counting numbers to at least 10. e.g., who has the biggest mouse or elephant families?
Reasoning MAe-3WM
Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions.
•    Can match whole numbers for e.g., the number 4, with 4 pictorial representations of the number.
•    Applies counting strategies to solve simple everyday problems and justify answers, eg recognises when an error occurs in matching pictorial representations and whole numbers.     Content:
MAe-4NA Counts to 30, and orders, reads and represents numbers in the range 0-20.
•    Makes groups of objects up to 10.
•    Matches numerals to the number of objects up to 10
•    Orders a set of numbers up to 10 from smallest to largest.

THIS IS A SAMPLE ONLY TO GUIDE YOU IN WHAT A SEQUENCE OF LESSONS MIGHT LOOK LIKE.

FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS ASSIGNMENT, YOU NEED TO INCLUDE ANOTHER SUBSTRAND TO INTEGRATE WITH WHOLE NUMBER.

CHOOSE EITHER ONE OVERARCHING CONCEPT TO DEVELOP, OR USE THE SAME OUTCOMES AND BUILD ON LEARNING IN EACH LESSON.
Resources:
Children’s book Seven Blind Mice by Ed Young
Glue sticks
Mouse and elephant numbered home templates (see attached)
Mice and elephants cut outs pre-cut for children (see attached)
Large piece of Cardboard
Markers
A4 cards labelled 1-10, with pictures of corresponding number of mice and elephants

Assessment Strategies:
Students’ samples of work will be annotated, showing how items have been ordered.
Observation notes – did students successfully match numerals with number of objects?
Photos will be taken of students working collaboratively in groups
Questioning and discussion of students’ strategies, eg how they have counted and matched items
Listening to students discuss strategies whilst ordering numbers
Teaching & Learning Activities
Introduction:  (10 mins)

Read Seven Blind Mice to children. While
reading:
Teaching Notes:

Avoid flipping through pages as the element of discovery will be lost.

•    On front page, count tails with children. Note that there are seven of them; make connection with the book’s title.
•    Count the mice when all grouped together. Get children to join in with counting e.g. 1,2,3,4 etc
•    Encourage students to make guesses as to what the ‘something’ might be.
•    Ask: Does anyone know what number comes after seven? Let children count out loud as far as they can go.

Can ascertain what number most children are comfortable counting to (students have little experience with whole numbers)

Body:  (20 mins)

Explain the task: Help your blind mice and elephants find their way home.
•    Each group gets a different mouse or elephant ‘house’ with a different ‘house number’ e.g. ranging from 1-10. (No one student in the group gets the same number)
•    Individually, children have to find the appropriate number of mice or elephants to match their house number.
•    Children glue mice/ elephants onto their ‘homes’.
•    Students then swap their homes with a partner and check that the right amounts of mice/elephants have been added to the appropriate number.
•    As a group, children are then instructed to order mice/ elephant homes from smallest to biggest.

Students are grouped together according to ability (groups of 4-5) and seated at desks.

Sally, Jesse and Raphael are capable of working with numbers 0-30. They will need the task differentiated.

Place pile of pre-cut mice or elephants in the middle of students and hand out glue sticks. Give one mice/elephant home to every student.

While students are busy with the task, listen to what students say when they arrange their mice/elephants. Do they talk about ‘adding’ or ‘taking away’ a mouse/ elephant?

While walking around the class, introduce the words ‘addition’ and ‘subtraction’ to students.

Observe children – what do they do to make up a particular number?
What strategies do they use?

Children have already mastered the concept of ‘smallest’ and ‘biggest’.
Conclusion:  (15 mins)

•    Ring ‘pack up bell’.
•    10 children are given large A4 number cards.  Children stand at the front of the classroom and place themselves in order. Encourage discussion of who goes where and why.

Ask students some of the following reflective questions allowing them enough time to think together as a group.
•    What maths do you think we used today to help your mice/ elephants get home?
•    What was the biggest family of mice/ elephants in your group?
What was the smallest?
How did you work this out?

Extension of questioning:
– Ask students to reflect on how many
people are in their own family.
– Ask students to find out what their own house number is.

When the ‘pack up bell’ is rung, children are aware that they should start packing up materials and pay attention to the teacher.

Ask children to sit on the floor but remain with their groups. Teacher selects two children from each group to participate in consolidation activity.

On a blank piece of cardboard, teacher writes down key words from children’s responses to consolidate learning.

Potential for differentiation and integration

•    Reduce number and picture cards to 5 for students who are really struggling
•    Extend number and picture cards to 30
•    Children label mouse/elephant house with correct numeral
•    For stage 1, children could use only odd/even numbers for the houses
•    Integrate with English and Science –  describe environments different animals live in

Lesson Evaluation:

Was the choice of concrete material appropriate for the content of the lesson?
Was the activity too simple?
Were the instructions clear?
Did grouping strategies work?
Did the students understand the task?
How would I change this lesson for future use?
Where do I take the students now?

MATHEMATICS LESSON PLAN # 2
Early Stage One, Kindergarten

Aim: Taking the previous lesson into account and students’ prior knowledge of whole numbers from one to ten, this lesson extends onto teaching students ordinal numbers. As a class, students will develop skills such as applying strategies, communicating and reasoning while learning the concept of ordinal numbers through positioning and a memory card game.
Learning Outcomes
Process:
Communicating MAe-1WM
Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings
•    Communicates with others using the correct ordinal terms.
•    Describes his or her ordinal position in relation to others.

Problem Solving MAe-2WM
Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
•    Applies counting strategies to solve simple everyday problems, eg checking matching quantities with numerals, and using trial and error and memory.
•    Uses process of elimination and memory to justify making particular choices.

Reasoning MAe-3WM
Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions.
•    Explains the reason for choosing a particular position e.g., first, third.
•    Recognises when other options have already been trialled and can think of new strategies to solve a problem.
Content:
MAe-4NA Counts to 30, and orders, reads and represents numbers in the range 0-20.
•    Compares and orders numbers and groups of objects in the range 1-10
•    Reads and uses ordinal number names to ‘first ‘to ‘tenth’.
•    Identifies the number before and after a given number in the range 1-10

MAe-16MG Describes position and gives and follows simple directions using everyday language
•    Is able to refer to another student’s position using ordinal numbers.
•    Identifies their own position in relation to ordinal numbers.

Resources:
Seven Blind Mice children’s book by Ed Young
Markers
Memory Game Cards (see attached)
Blank pieces of card to write ordinals on (see examples attached)

Assessment Strategies:
– Observation of students during activity – were numbers identified before and after correct?
– Questions posed by students to describe their position
– Photos taken of students participating in memory game activity
– Explanation of strategies used by children when describing use of ordinal numbers
Teaching & Learning Activities
Introduction:  (10 minutes)
Re-read Seven Blind Mice with children asking    Teaching Notes:
Remind children of the previous lesson and
them to pay close attention to the ‘order’ of the mice.
•    Ask students what they think the word ‘order’ means, allowing students to contribute to discussion.
•    Relate to any sports/ games/ real- life experiences where someone comes first, second, third etc.

Explain what ordinal numbers are.

Skim through Seven Blind Mice again. This time the teacher with the students, writes down every ordinal number they come across on a piece of blank card adding eighth, ninth, and tenth also. These ordinals will then be stuck across the chalkboard/whiteboard in order for children to use in the next activity.    reading about the seven blind mice. Explain that we’ve learnt how to count to ten using whole numbers, and now we are going to learn about the ‘positions’ or ‘orders’ of those numbers.

Have students seated on the floor.

Ensure all students grasp the concept before moving on.

As this is the first time children are exposed to the concept of ordinals, having the words written on the board will work as reminders and scaffold the children to use the correct terms. When children master the terms/become more confident, ordinal cards can be taken down.
Body:  (25 minutes)
Explain task to children: We’re going to play a memory card game, but we’re going to use ordinal numbers to do it.
–    Need 10 children to stand facing the rest of the class in a line.
–    Students will be standing under the ordinals stuck on the board; one ordinal number per student.
–    Hand out memory game cards to the 10 children (see attached).
–    Children holding the cards should have the black side facing the rest of the ‘audience’.
–    There are two matching cards of each colour (purple, blue, orange, red and green- same colours as first 5 mice)
Teacher should go down the row of students and have the class ‘count’ with her the order of the standing students e.g. ‘Mary is first, Johnny is second, James is third’ etc.

–    Call on one student in the ‘audience’ to try and make a match. They do this by calling out the ordinal number position of the student who they want to turn their card. Example: The second person and the sixth person. The students cannot call them by name; they must use the ordinal number words.
–    The students whose numbers are called turn their cards around to the ‘audience’. If the colours match, then those two students sit down right where they are in line so that they maintain the ordinal positions of everyone. If it is not a match, then those students turn their cards back around and someone else in the ‘audience’ tries to make a match. Continue until all matches have been made.
–    After all the matches have been found get the ‘ordinal’ students and the ‘audience’ students to swap roles and play again.
Have all children still seated on the floor while teacher explains the rules of the game. Remind students that everyone is going to get a go at standing out the front so not to get upset if they don’t get chosen first.

Observe children

The children in the audience:
What strategies are they using to choose ‘ordinal students’?
How well do they remember particular colours and positions?
Do they use the correct ordinal terms?

The children in the ordinal positions:
How well do they remember what ordinal number they are?
Do they understand that they are representative of that number, or do they need more guiding?

Conclusion:  (10 minutes)

Finish the lesson by asking all the students to return to the floor. Ask the following questions, giving children time to properly reflect.

– When and where do you think it might be useful to know about ordinal numbers? E.g. sport, what grade someone is in at school, waiting in lines etc
– Are ordinal numbers the same as normal numbers? Why? Why not?
– Which mouse from our story do you think was the smartest? What ordinal position was he in?

As a class, organise coloured Memory Game cards into the same order as the Seven Blind Mice.
Teacher can refer back to book and ask children:
Can you remember which coloured mouse came first?
Can you remember which coloured mouse came second? etc .

Recap at end of lesson by asking children to place the ordinal number words over the coloured squares (representative of the mice)

Students are beginning to sequence events which will lead onto the next lesson.

Facilitate children’s discussion of ordinal numbers being used in everyday life. Help explain the relevance and importance of understanding ordinals.

Will only be able to do this up until fifth ordinal as there will only be five different colours from the memory game. Teacher should also prepare a yellow and white square to represent the sixth and seventh mice).
Potential for differentiation and integration
•    Put only odd/even ordinal numbers from smallest to largest
•    Match ordinal number names in words and numerals, to picture of objects, eg. First  1st  ?
•    Links to English and HPE – reading/writing ordinal numbers, and keeping score in a sports activity

Lesson Evaluation:

Was using a memory game effective in teaching ordinal numbers and positions?
Were students able to grasp the concept of themselves being representative of an ordinal or was it difficult to understand this?
Were there any unexpected outcomes?
Did students finish the lesson with a sound grasp of the concepts taught?
Were students able to link lesson content with everyday life?
Did the lesson cater to all learning styles?
Were my behaviour management strategies effective?

MATHEMATICS LESSON PLAN # 3
Early Stage One, Kindergarten

Aim: Through the use of a computerised scenario, students as a whole class and in pairs will learn the days of the week in order and will be able to use the terms ‘Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’ in their understanding of ‘time’. Students will develop skills such as questioning, applying strategies and communicating.
Learning Outcomes
PROCESS
Communicating MAe-1WM
Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings
•    Talks about mathematical experiences e.g., yesterday I did this… tomorrow I will …
•    Can name the days of the week in chronological order.
•    Asks questions related to time, eg. is tomorrow Wednesday?

Problem Solving MAe-2WM
Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
•    Solves maths problems using strategies that involve trial and error.
•    Creates an image/shape using the  Paint program on computer
•    Explores mathematical concepts and answers with computerised scenarios.
CONTENT
MAe-4NA Counts to 30, and orders, reads and represents numbers in the range 0-20.
•    Can order numbers from 1 to 7, corresponding with seven days of the week.
•    Names the number represented by a day in the week for e.g., Monday is the first day of the week.

MAe-13MG Sequences events, uses everyday language to describe the duration of events, and reads hour time on clocks
•    Uses the terms ‘yesterday’, ‘today’, ‘tomorrow’.
•    Names and orders the days of the week and identifies week-days and weekend days.
•    Describes ‘night-time’ and the activities associated with this time.

Resources:
– Seven Blind Mice children’s book by Ed Young
– Interactive Whiteboard
– Individual computers
– ‘Days of the Week’ game which can be accessed at http://www.roythezebra.com/reading-games/high-frequency-words-days.html
(see attached)
– Flash cards – e.g. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday (see attached)
– ‘Days of the Week’ song lyrics (see attached)
Assessment Strategies:
– Digital photographs with annotations of strategies children used to order numbers
– Observation notes, including recording of questions asked by children when identifying bed time things for Tom
– Explanation of strategies used by children when ordering days of the week cards
– Explanation and demonstration of concepts yesterday, today and tomorrow using days of the week cards
Teaching & Learning Activities:
Introduction:  (10 minutes)
– Re-read ‘Seven Blind Mice’ with children asking    Teaching Notes:
Have students seated on the floor in front of
them to pay close attention to the days of the week in the story. While reading, prompt children by asking: Which day do you think comes next?
– After book is read, ask students: Do you know what days of the week are school days? What are weekend days?
– Teacher scaffolds children with flash cards depicting the different names of each day e.g. Monday, Tuesday etc
– Together teacher and students read aloud each day as it is shown.

– On the interactive whiteboard go through ‘Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow activity’ (see attached) with students. Teacher chooses three students to fill in each blank word.     teacher.

Facilitate discussion by referring back to Seven Blind Mice, giving examples from story

May need to do a few times to consolidate learning. When students are confident, move on.

Students are familiar with the interactive whiteboard technology and understand the concept of ‘click and drag’.
Body:   (25 minutes)

Explain the task to students: Tom the Zebra wants to go to bed, but hasn’t got all the things he needs to help him sleep.
-Discuss the things students may like to help them sleep at night time e.g., blankets, pyjamas, socks etc
– Discuss what things Tom the Zebra might like.

– Teacher explains to students that they can help Tom get all his ‘bed time things’ by putting the days of the week in the right order.
– On interactive whiteboard, teacher models how to play the game and asks students to read the days of the week at the bottom of the reading game (see attached image)
– Teacher models clicking and dragging words into the box.

– After modelled exercise with the whole class, explain to students they will now be working in pairs to help Tom. Divide students into pairs. Each pair will share a computer.

– Students take turns with playing the game and ensure each student has a turn at controlling the mouse.

Students are still seated on the floor while task is modelled.

Students understand the concept of ‘ordering’ things due to previous lesson.

Students will be grouped according to ability.
Name students and direct pairs to their computers one pair at a time, ask students to walk quietly and slowly to their computers.
Teacher to ensure game is set up and ready for students to use on computers.

Teacher moves around classroom giving support where necessary, ensuring correct use of the mouse.
Conclusion:  (10 minutes)

Ask questions such as:
How did you help Tom the Zebra get all of his bed time things?
Why is it important to know the days of the week?
What day of the week do we start school? What is the first day of the weekend?

End lesson with the ‘Days of the Week’ song (see attached) that can be used in subsequent lessons or as a routine activity every morning.
– Song is quite catchy and easy to sing along to.
– Song works to consolidate lesson’s content.
– As you sing the names of the days in the song, hold up the corresponding flash cards. If time permits, select children to hold up the corresponding flash cards as you sing the day of the week. This can be done a few times.

Have students return to the floor and seated in front of teacher. Ask reflective questions then sing the song to the tune of The Addams Family theme song.

Encourage students to join in singing the song.
Potential for differentiation and integration

•    Sequence pictures in order according to digital time
•    Play ‘day before and after’ snap with flashcards
•    English integration – listening to, reading and writing days of the week

Lesson Evaluation:

Was the level of difficulty appropriate? Eg, were the activities too simple/ hard?
Were all students at the same level or did some need more scaffolding with the use of the computers?
Was working in pairs effective for this lesson or would children have been more productive working individually?
Was the conclusion of the lesson effective in consolidating students’ learning of the days of the week?
Did my questions offer enough reflection?
Where do I take students now?

‘Days of the Week’ song sung to the tune of the Addam’s Family theme song.

Sung to the tune of The Addam’s Family theme song

Days of the week (snap, snap)
Days of the week (snap, snap)
Days of the week, days of the week, days of the week (snap, snap)
There’s Sunday then there’s Monday
Tuesday then there’s Wednesday
Thursday then there’s Friday
And then there’s Saturday
Days of the week (snap, snap)
Days of the week (snap, snap)
Days of the week, days of the week, days of the week (snap, snap)

REFERENCE LIST

Make sure all resources are included in the reference list, cited in APA referencing style, and in alphabetical order.

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