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Knowledge Creation Module Syllabus Learner Experience The aim of this module is to provide students with a philosophical and methodological underpinning of knowledge creation in management research. The module will provide students with key theories to support their application of action research during the programme and place action research in historical context. In the construction of knowledge, it is important that students consider what management research is; how to understand the relation between cause and meaning; the notion of positivism, idealism, realism and postmodernism; the nature of the qualitative process and the nature of the quantitative process. Module Aims At the end of this module, students will have gained an understanding of the issues involved in knowledge creation and will: 0 Understand the philosophical history of social scientific research and how this affects management research in particular; 0 Be familiar with debates about the purpose of management research, the process of knowledge creation and dissemination into managerial practice; 0 Understand a range of concepts in management research, including positivism and interpretivism; objectivism and constructionism; modernism and postmodernism; quantitative and qualitative, and be able to apply them critically; 0 Have a critical awareness of the influence of power, politics and ethics on management research; 0 Have an appreciation of how understandings of management research affect the theory and practice of action research.

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Knowledge Creation
Module Syllabus
Learner Experience
The aim of this module is to provide students with a philosophical and
methodological underpinning of knowledge creation in management research.
The module will provide students with key theories to support their application of
action research during the programme and place action research in historical
context. In the construction of knowledge, it is important that students consider
what management research is; how to understand the relation between cause
and meaning; the notion of positivism, idealism, realism and postmodernism; the
nature of the qualitative process and the nature of the quantitative process.
Module Aims
At the end of this module, students will have gained an understanding of the
issues involved in knowledge creation and will:





Understand the philosophical history of social scientific research and how
this affects management research in particular;
Be familiar with debates about the purpose of management research, the
process of knowledge creation and dissemination into managerial
practice;
Understand a range of concepts in management research, including
positivism and interpretivism; objectivism and constructionism; modernism
and postmodernism; quantitative and qualitative, and be able to apply
them critically;
Have a critical awareness of the influence of power, politics and ethics on
management research;
Have an appreciation of how understandings of management research
affect the theory and practice of action research.
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
1
Module Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module the student will be able to:







Describe the history and development of social scientific investigation with
specific relevance to action research (e.g. within pragmatism, symbolic
interactionism, and phenomenology)
Define the concepts of positivism and interpretivism; objectivism and
constructionism; modernism and postmodernism and appreciate how they
imply different methodological approaches to management research;
Evaluate the advantages and limitations associated with quantitative and
qualitative research strategies;
Apply concepts of quality and relevance to management research and
understand how assessments of quality and relevance are affected by
historical, societal and political context;
Reflect on why management research is conducted and critically evaluate
the competing models of knowledge creation that may be used to justify
and legitimate it;
Evaluate the role of personal beliefs, values and ethics on the conduct of
management research;
Apply skills of formulating research problems and questions, research
strategy and research design to the action research project.
Module in Relation to the DBA Programme
The module is a core module for the DBA programme. It provides a framework
for academic and strategic thinking. The module is designed so that previous
knowledge of other modules is not required.
Learning Strategies
The mode of delivery of taught modules is by distance learning over the Internet.
This mode of study enables students to pursue modules via home study. Module
delivery involves the establishment of a virtual classroom in which a relatively
small group of students (usually 12–15) work under the direction of the Doctoral
Tutor both as a larger group and in two smaller learning sets, using an internetbased distance learning package. Communication within the virtual classroom is
asynchronous, preserving the requirement that students are able to pursue the
module in their own time, within the weekly time-frame of each seminar.
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
2
All communications that take place within the virtual classroom, including all
assignments carried out by students and assessments by Instructors, are
recorded and are available for scrutiny by staff with appropriate access
permissions. This enables two aspects of quality control:


Module delivery is monitored by staff of the University of Liverpool
Management School to ensure that defined syllabuses, procedures, and
assessment processes are followed, appropriate standards are
maintained and to check that plagiarism has been detected.
All assessment is subject to moderation both by the Management School
e-Learning Unit and by the external examiner.
In addition to the online learning paradigm discussed above, this Programme
integrates Critical Action Learning (CAL) as a means of both intensifying the
learning experience in general and linking theory to practice in particular. In the
Programme’s instantiation of CAL:







Students will be formed into learning sets (functioning as applied problemsolving and learning groups) during each module.
The primary purpose of the learning sets is to aid team members in the
critical identification, review and resolution of particular, workplace-based
problems that each student brings to their team.
The learning sets will be “facilitated” by the Doctoral Tutor.
It is through this facilitated critical review process whereby the student
identifies and defines an issue to work on (known as “problematising” in
the literature) and then subsequently works on the resolution of that
problem aided by conversation with and insightful questioning from other
members of the team. Through this process, the students develop
significant, doctoral-level depth of learning in each module.
The instructor will assess the quality of each student’s input to their team
members during the course of the module. This assessment will form 25%
of the student’s grade and this element must be passed in order for the
student to pass the module.
Having worked through this process with the team, students write up this
problem identification, review, and solving process. This piece of work
(known as the CAL Project) constitutes a significant portion of the
student’s grade.
Each CAL Project is developed and graded within the context of its
associated module. However, students will be encouraged to view these
“mini projects” as opportunities (1) to hone successively their doctoral
research skills and (2) to identify appropriate problems for their action
research thesis.
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
3
Self-study
The self-study part of the course includes:
• Required and recommended reading related to each week’s topics
• Hyperlinks to Web-based materials related to each week’s topics
• Links to media that support the week’s activities
Weekly notes
Each week’s theme is made up of several topics. These are introduced and
explained in turn in the weekly notes for the week. The weekly notes are also
available as recorded sound files. However, you should note that the sound files
may differ slightly from the text versions. For example, the full references to
sources, Internet addresses, and so on, are given only in the text files. You can
listen to the recorded versions of the lecture notes as many times as you want
and download the sound files to your computer or other devices.
Required Texts and Software
Johnson, P. and Duberley, J. (2000) Understanding Management Research: An
Introduction to Epistemology. London: Sage.
Thorpe, R. and Holt, R. (2008) The Sage Dictionary of Qualitative Management
Research. London: Sage.
Students should have access to word processing software in order to complete
activities and assignments.
Journal Articles
Students can access all of the required journal articles online in the Liverpool
University Library for Online Programmes at
http://www.liv.ac.uk/library/ohecampus/index.htm . Links to these articles are also
provided in the appropriate Weekly Learning Resources Areas.
Students are encouraged to make use of related academic and professional
journals to supplement the module materials and to assist in the preparation of
assignments. Many of these serials can be accessed through the University of
Liverpool Library for Online Programmes.
Module readings
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
4
Students are provided with weekly reading assignments, which can be found in
the weekly Readings folder.
Students are encouraged to make use of related academic and professional
journals to supplement the course materials and to assist in the preparation of
assignments. Many of these serials can be accessed through the University of
Liverpool electronic library resources at
http://www.liv.ac.uk/library/ohecampus/index.htm.
Media files
You will need an audio player, such as Windows Media Player, if you want to
listen to the recorded version of the lecture notes. (The text version is also
provided and you do not have to listen to the media files if you prefer the written
text).
Overview of Module Work
See the “Syllabus by Week” section at the end of this document for weekly
activities and assignments, as well as due dates.
NB: Please note that for each of the following module work items, word counts
for responses and submitted documents are approximate. It is acceptable to
submit a work product that is within 25% of the approximate word count.

Literature Syntheses are required in Weeks 1, 2, and 3, and Weeks 6, 7,
and 8, and pertain to the weekly assigned readings.

Learning Set Participation is required in each week of the module.
Remember that your responses will be assessed based upon the
timeliness and quality of your work in the set. You are expected to
participate substantially; specifically, to post at least 3 or 4 meaningful and
insightful responses to your Learning Set. For example, the Instructor will
look for the following items in your posts: Asking insightful questions
o
o
o
o
Offering contributions based upon the literature and their practice
Must be adding to the learning of the group
Must be critically collaborative inquiry
Should promote critical reflection in team members
Your Learning Set participation will be assessed in two segments. Following the
completion of Week 5, you will receive feedback and an initial grade based on
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
5
your Learning Set participation in Weeks 1-5. This assessment will form 10% of
your total grade. At the end of the module, you will receive additional feedback
and a second grade based on your Learning Set participation in Weeks 6-10.
This assessment will form 15% of your grade, for a total of 25% for Learning Set
participation overall.

The Critical Literature Review, due in Week 4, is a 2,000-word
document and is the first component of the CAL project. This document
should:
o Frame the identified problem in the context of the relevant literature
o Identify different viewpoints on the problem from the literature
o Provide the theoretical scaffolding for the problematising process

The Problematising Write-up, due in Week 5, is a 750-word document
and is the second component of the CAL project. This document
summarises how the identified issue was problematised and how this
process impacted the final statement of the problem

The CAL Final Report, due in Week 10, is a 2,500-word document
(beyond the literature review and problematising write-up) that details how
you approached solving the identified problem, issues encountered during
the problem-solving process, and outcomes from the process. As such,
the final report is the final component of the CAL project and:
o Provides both a narrative of whole project and the iterative process
of engaging with the identified problem
o May be written in the 1st or 3rd person
o Identifies the steps taken to address the problem
o Indicates how the literature informed the process
o Provides results and conclusions drawn from the process
o Students will have an opportunity to resubmit this element of
assessment if the first submission does not reach a pass standard.
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
6
It is understood that issues may arise in the workplace which may prevent
students from undertaking or completing such “change” oriented projects. It is the
role of the Doctoral Tutor to work with the students in such situations to identify
an appropriate project which may be based more on a literature review and the
development of a proposal for a change project rather than the actual
implementation of a change project. This will be allowed in two modules only.
The module assessment structure is designed such that student progress is
monitored on a week by week basis. Therefore, student progress issues will be
managed in a timely fashion during the module and throughout the programme.
Assessment
The table below outlines the mandatory contribution in each category and the
weight that applies to each component.
Weeks
1
2
3
Literature Synthesis
X
X
X
Learning Set Participation,
Part 1
X
X
X
4
X
5
Problematising Write-Up
CAL Final Report
6
7
8
X
X
X
9
10
% of
EOM
10
X
Learning Set Participation,
Part 2
Critical Literature Review
Weight
10
X
X
X
X
X
X
15
10
X
20
X
35
Total
100
Student performance on the modules (inclusive of the 20 instructional credits and
10 of the research credits applied via CAL and AR) will be assessed according to
the above structure. For general information on assessment and grading, please
consult the Student Handbook section pertaining to DBA Grading at
http://www.uol.ohecampus.com/handbook/hb/index.html.
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
7
Syllabus by Week
Week 1: The Purpose of Management Knowledge
Learning Objectives



Analyse the historical roots and contemporary development of
management knowledge
Critically assess the role of communities of practice in management
knowledge creation
Evaluate the characteristics of management as a field of study
Readings

Introduction to Learning Set Participation

Bartunek, J.M., Rynes, S.L. & Ireland, R.D. (2006) ‘What makes
management research interesting and why does it matter?’ Academy of
Management Journal, 49 (1), pp.9-15.

Huff, A.S. & Huff, J.O. (2001) ‘Re-focusing the business school agenda’,
British Journal of Management, 12, pp.S49-S54.

Huff, A.S. (2000) ‘1999 Presidential address: changes in organizational
knowledge production’, Academy of Management Review, 25 (2), pp.288293.

Starkey, K. & Tempest, S. (2008) ‘A clear sense of purpose? The evolving
role of the business school’, Journal of Management Development, 27 (4),
pp.379-390.

Tranfield, D. & Starkey, K. (1998) ‘The nature, social organization and
promotion of management research: towards policy’, British Journal of
Management, 9 (4), pp.207-222.

Wilkinson, A. & Mellahi, K. (2005) ‘Organizational failure: Introduction to
the special issue’, Long Range Planning: International Journal of Strategic
Management, 38 (3), pp.233–238.
Media

Video: Fifty Lessons Ltd. (2011). Managing the data deluge.
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
8
Literature Synthesis

Post your Literature Synthesis both to your Learning Set and to the
Turnitin link provided by Saturday (Day 3)
Learning Set Introductions

Post your introduction on Thursday (Day 1), the first day of class, and be
sure to respond to at least three of your colleagues by Saturday (Day 3).
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions in the Learning Set by Monday
(Day 5) and respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On
Days 1- 4 (Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set
members with questions about the reading or with your answers to the
assigned questions.
Week 2: Rigour and Relevance
Learning Objectives



Analyse the difference between rigour and relevance and the relationship
between them
Evaluate the logics of discovery and application in the creation of
management knowledge
Critically analyse the concepts of evidence-based management and
systematic review as a methodology for knowledge creation
Readings



Anderson, N., Heriot, P., & Hodgkinson, G.P. (2001) ‘The practitionerresearcher divide in industrial, work and organizational (IWO) psychology:
where are we now and where do we go from here?’ Journal of
Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 74 (4), pp.391-411.
Bennis, W.G. & O’Toole, J. (2005) ‘How business schools lost their way’,
Harvard Business Review, 83 (5), pp.96-104.
Morrell, K. (2008) ‘The narrative of “evidence based” management: a
polemic’, Journal of Management Studies, 45 (3), pp.613-635.
Knowledge Creation
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
9

Rousseau, D.M. (2006) ‘Is there such a thing as evidence-based
management?’ Academy of Management Review, 31 (2), pp.256-269.

Shrivastava, P. (1987) ‘Rigor and practical usefulness of research in
strategic management’, Strategic Management Journal, 8 (1), pp.77-92.

Starkey, K., Hatchuel, A., & Tempest, S. (2009) ‘Management research
and the new logics of discovery and engagement’, Journal of Management
Studies, 46 (3), pp.547-558.
Literature Synthesis

Post your Literature Synthesis both to your Learning Set and to the
Turnitin link provided by Saturday (Day 3)
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions in the Learning Set by Monday
(Day 5) and respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On
Days 1- 4 (Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set
members with questions about the reading or with your answers to the
assigned questions.
Week 3: Perspectives and Paradigms
Learning Objectives



Analyse the philosophical positions of positivism and interpretivism in
management research
Describe the concept of paradigms and discuss how this is applied in
management research
Evaluate how these ideas inform the traditions of quantitative and
qualitative research
Readings

Donaldson, L. (2008) ‘Vita contemplativa—Following the scientific method:
how I became a committed functionalist and positivist’, Organization
Studies, 26 (7), pp.1071-1088.
Knowledge Creation
10
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013

Hassard, J. (1991) ‘Multiple paradigms and organizational analysis: a case
study’, Organization Studies, 12 (2), pp.275–299.

Jackson, N. & Carter, P. (1991) ‘In defence of paradigm
incommensurability’, Organization Studies, 12 (1), pp.109–127.

Morgan, G. (1980) ‘Paradigms, metaphors, and puzzle solving in
organization theory’, Administrative Science Quarterly, 25 (4), pp.605-622.

Van Maanen, J. (1995) ‘Style as theory’, Organization Science, 6 (1),
pp.133-143.

Willmott, H. (1993) ‘Breaking the paradigm mentality’, Organization
Studies, 14 (5), pp.681–719.
Literature Synthesis

Post your Literature Synthesis both to your Learning Set and to the
Turnitin link provided by Saturday (Day 3)
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions both to the Learning Set
Discussion forum and to the Turnitin link provided by Monday (Day 5) and
respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On Days 1- 4
(Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set members with
questions about the reading or with your answers to the above questions.
Week 4: Postmodernism and Critical Management Research
Learning Objectives




Analyse the main postpositivist research traditions, including
postmodernism and critical management studies, and explain their
relationship to modernism and positivism
Describe the implications of postpositivist traditions for management
knowledge creation
Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses associated with these
approaches
Critically review literature about knowledge creation
Readings
Knowledge Creation
11
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013

Document: Critical Literature Review Handout (PDF)

Alvesson, M. & Deetz, S. (2004) ‘Critical theory and postmodernism:
approaches to organization studies’. In S. Clegg, C. Hardy & W. Nord
(eds.) Handbook of Organization Studies (2nd ed.). London: Sage.

Alvesson, M. (1995) ‘The meaning and meaninglessness of
postmodernism: some ironic remarks’, Organization Studies, 16 (6),
pp.1047–1075.

Calàs, M.B. & Smircich, L. (1999) ‘Past postmodernism? Reflections and
tentative directions’, Academy of Management Review, 24 (4), pp.649671.

Chia, R. (1995) ‘From modern to postmodern organizational analysis’,
Organization Studies, 16 (4), pp.579-604.

Fournier, V. & Grey, C. (2000) ‘At the critical moment: conditions and
prospects for critical management studies’, Human Relations, 53 (1), pp.732.

Kilduff, M. & Mehra, A. (1997) ‘Postmodernism and organizational
research’, Academy of Management Review, 22 (2), pp.453-481.
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions both to the Learning Set
Discussion forum and to the Turnitin link provided by Monday (Day 5) and
respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On Days 1- 4
(Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set members with
questions about the reading or with your answers to the above questions.
Critical Literature Review

Post your Critical Literature Review by Wednesday (Day 7)
Week 5: Problematising in Knowledge Creation
Learning Objectives

Apply the problematising process to a workplace-based problem
Knowledge Creation
12
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
Readings
There are no required readings this week.
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions both to the Learning Set
Discussion forum and to the Turnitin link provided by Monday (Day 5) and
respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On Days 1- 4
(Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set members with
questions about the reading or with your answers to the above questions.
Problematising Write-up

Post your write-up by Wednesday (Day 7)
Week 6: Reactions to Change and Crisis
Learning Objectives




Evaluate ways to make effective decisions during change/crisis scenarios
Evaluate problems in the planning and implementation of organisational
change and crisis
Describe the behavioural and political issues surrounding the
implementation of organizational change and crisis
Analyse the role of leadership in managing through and learning from
crisis situations
Readings

Abrahamson, E. (1991) ‘Managerial fads and fashions: the diffusion and
rejection of innovations’, Academy of Management Review, 16, pp.586612.

Barley, S.R. and Kunda, G. (1992) ‘Design and devotion: surges of
rational and normative ideologies of control in managerial discourse’,
Administrative Science Quarterly, 37, pp.363-399.

Guest, D. (1992) ‘Right enough to be dangerously wrong’, in G. Salaman
(ed.) Human Resource Strategies, pp.5-19. Buckingham: Open University
Press.
Knowledge Creation
13
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013

Huczynski, A.A. (1993) ‘Explaining the succession of management fads’,
International Journal of Human Resource Management, 4 (2), pp.443-463.

Ramsay, H. (1977) ‘Cycles of control: worker participation in sociological
and historical perspective’, Sociology, 11 (3), pp.481-506.
Literature Synthesis

Post your Literature Synthesis both to your Learning Set and to the
Turnitin link provided by Saturday (Day 3)
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions both to the Learning Set
Discussion forum and to the Turnitin link provided by Monday (Day 5) and
respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On Days 1- 4
(Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set members with
questions about the reading or with your answers to the above questions.
Week 7: Politics and Ethics
Learning Objectives




Critically evaluate the routes through which management knowledge is
produced and disseminated
Evaluate the measures of quality that are applied to quantitative and
qualitative research and consider their relative status as forms of
knowledge creation
Analyse the role of knowledge creation in enabling less powerful
organisational voices to be heard and understood
Analyse the ethical implications of the knowledge creation process within
a context of ethical oversight and debates about bureaucratization
Readings

Bell, E. & Bryman, A. (2007) ‘The ethics of management research: an
exploratory content analysis’, British Journal of Management, 18(1),
pp.63-77.

C.R. & Greenwood, R. (2002), ‘ASQ Forum: disconnects and
consequences in organization theory?’, Administrative Science Quarterly,
Knowledge Creation
14
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
47 (3), pp.411–421.

Clegg, S.R. (2002) ‘“Lives in the balance”: A comment on Hinings and
Greenwood’s “Disconnects and consequences in organization theory?”’
Administrative Science Quarterly, 47 (3), pp.428-441.

Easterby-Smith, M., Golden-Biddle, K. & Locke, K. (2008) ‘Working with
pluralism: determining quality in qualitative research’, Organizational
Research Methods, 11 (3), pp.419-429.

Grey, C. (2010) ‘Organizing studies: publications, politics and polemic’,
Organization Studies, 31 (6), pp.677-694.

Pratt, M.G. (2008) ‘Fitting oval pegs into round holes: tensions in
evaluating and publishing qualitative research in top-tier North American
journals’, Organizational Research Methods, 11 (3), pp.481-509.
Literature Synthesis

Post your Literature Synthesis both to your Learning Set and to the
Turnitin link provided by Saturday (Day 3)
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions both to the Learning Set
Discussion forum and to the Turnitin link provided by Monday (Day 5) and
respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On Days 1- 4
(Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set members with
questions about the reading or with your answers to the above questions.
Week 8: Insider and Action Research
Learning Objectives



Analyse the competing traditions of insider and outsider research,
including participatory methods of knowledge co-production
Evaluate the implications of different forms of action research for
practicing managers
Describe the relationship between theory and practice within action
research
Readings
Knowledge Creation
15
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013

Brannick, T. & Coghlan, D. (2007) ‘In defense of being “native”: The case
for insider academic research’, Organizational Research Methods, 10 (1),
pp. 59-74.

Cassell, C. & Johnson, P. (2006) ‘Action research: explaining the
diversity’, Human Relations, 59 (6), pp.783-814.

Coghlan, D. (2001) ‘Insider action research projects: Implications for
practising managers’, Management Learning, 32 (1), pp.49-60.

Eden, C. & Huxham, C. (March 1996 or 2005?) ‘Action research for
management research’, British Journal of Management, 7(1), pp. 75-86.

Evered, R. & Louis, M.R. (1981) ‘Alternative perspectives in the
organizational sciences: “Inquiry from the inside” and “inquiry from the
outside.”’ Academy of Management Review, 6 (3), pp.385-395.

Greenwood, D.J., Whyte, W.F. & Harkavy, I. (1993) ‘Participatory action
research as a process and as a goal’, Human Relations, 46 (2), pp. 175192.

Zuber-Skerritt, O. & Perry, C. (2002) ‘Action research within organisations
and university thesis writing,’ The Learning Organization, 9(4), 171-179.
Literature Synthesis

Post your Literature Synthesis both to your Learning Set and to the
Turnitin link provided by Saturday (Day 3)
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions both to the Learning Set
Discussion forum and to the Turnitin link provided by Monday (Day 5) and
respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On Days 1- 4
(Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set members with
questions about the reading or with your answers to the above questions.
Week 9: Personal Values and Reflexivity
Learning Objectives

Evaluate the impact of reflexivity in management knowledge creation
Knowledge Creation
16
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013

Analyse the role of reflexivity within competing paradigms of management
research
Readings

Bigley, G.A. & Roberts, K.H. (2001) ‘The incident command system: high
reliability organizing for complex and volatile task environments’, Academy
of Management Journal, 44 (6) pp.1281–1299.

Carmeli, A. & Markman, G.D. (2010) ‘Capture, governance, and resilience:
strategy implications from the history of Rome’, Strategic Management
Journal.

Comfort, L.K., Sungu, Y., Johnson, D. & Dunn, M. (2001) ‘Complex
systems in crisis: Anticipation and resilience in dynamic environments’,
Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 9 (3), pp.144–158.

Kaplan, S. (2008) ‘Framing contests: strategy making under uncertainty’,
Organization Science, 19 (5), pp.729–752.

Roberts, K.H. (1990) ‘Some characteristics of one type of high reliability
organization’, Organization Science, 1 (2), pp.160–177.
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions to the Learning Set by Monday
(Day 5) and respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On
Days 1- 4 (Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set
members with questions about the reading or with your answers to the
above questions.
Week 10: The CAL Final Report
Learning Objectives



Evaluate the role of knowledge creation in addressing workplace-based
problems
Analyse the cultural, historical and political complexities of the knowledge
creation process
Evaluate how this module has affected personal approaches to
addressing workplace-based problems
Knowledge Creation
17
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.
Last update: 23 May, 2013
Readings

Document: CAL Final Report Sample Structure
Learning Set Participation

Post your initial response to the questions to the Learning Set by Monday
(Day 5) and respond to your teammates by Wednesday (Day 7). On
Days 1- 4 (Thursday-Sunday) be sure to engage your learning set
members with questions about the reading or with your answers to the
above questions.
CAL Final Report

Post your Report by Wednesday (Day 7)
The Doctoral Development Plan (DDP) Entry
Knowledge Creation
18
Copyright – Laureate Online Education © All rights reserved, 2000 – 2013,
The module, in all its parts: syllabus, guidelines, lectures, discussion questions, technical notes, images and any
additional material is copyrighted by Laureate Online Education B.V.

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